bigbrains.com

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Date/Time
Saturday, February 6, 2016
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Location
Hahn Hall

Categories


Program Information

Bill Ramsay: bigbrains.com,
a comic mini-opera

  • Kyra Folk-Farber, soprano
  • Christine Hollinger, soprano
  • Adam Bradley, tenor
  • Andre Shillo, baritone
  • Christopher Davis, piano

Notes on the Program

by Betty Oberacker

After last season’s very successful presentation of scenes from bigbrains.com by Santa Barbara composer William Ramsay, the Music Club audience will now be treated to the World Premiere of the comic mini-opera in its entirety!

Performers will include sopranos Kyra Folk-Farber and Christine Hollinger, tenor Adam Bradley, baritone Andre Shillo, and pianist Christopher Davis.

In the composer’s words, “Bigbrains.com is a short comic opera based on the current rage for developing new information technologies – often by tiny startup firms. It takes place in the not-so-distant future. Jesse and Lisa, partners in bigbrains.com, have developed a brand-new media concept — they sing “It All Starts With the Idea.” They are hoping to merge with a large firm — owned by Hugo. Lisa has a yen for Jesse: she sings “I’m at a loss about my boss.” But Jesse has his eye on Sabrina, who sings about her frustration with her work life in “I.T. Gal, I.T. Gal” and also airs her feelings about already being trapped in a relationship with another guy. These emotional problems become even more complicated and end up threatening to sink the planned merger as the gang sings “No Merger? No Merger!” But in the end, technology may change but love stays pretty much the same, the emotional conflicts seem to get resolved, and the four of them go on to plan the marketing of their revolutionary method of handling the news. (Their concept, however, does turn out to have a hauntingly familiar ring to it.)”

And with the plot thickening, with the soloists conversing animatedly and singing such arias as “There’s No Mystery Why Matt Is History,” and “Handy, Dandy, It’s The Latest It’s the Greatest,” and with the music attractively enhancing the dramatic proceedings, it all turns out for the best in the end.